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Louis Haywood

Indeed, my scheme for BRT in Baton Rouge also includes "Freeway BRT" along I-110.

EngineerScotty

Back in the 1970s, a bus could pull off of US26 at Sylvan, take in/drop off passengers, and re-enter free flowing traffic most of the time. Beaverton and Hillsboro were farm towns back then, not girnormous bedroom communities and industrial centers. Today, running busses on the Sunset Highway is a dubious proposition due to the high probability they will be stuck in traffic.... which is why most outer westside busses now feed MAX. The fact that MAX runs at about 5-minute headways during rush hour between Beaverton and downtown makes this transfer less bothersome.

Corey Burger

Interesting. I live in a capital city (Victoria, BC) with a major university (University of Victoria) and yet we remain transit-hopeful.

Alon Levy

Why doesn't the plan include more bus line density in the center of the city?

Louis Haywood

I'd also add that Baton Rouge, LA is a capital-university town of 400,000, very transit hopeful.

One thing I appreciate from John's Columbus Plan is the naming of each stop on the frequent map. In Europe, many cities have bus maps on which every last stop has a unique name. Paris, Brussels, Marseilles, and several more. I can see how this is more difficult in North American/Australian cities with grids, but individual names for stops is invaluable for branding and coherence.

John

Jarrett,
Thanks for the write-up and links. Since you couldn't find out who I am, here's some background.

I'm a transportation engineer/planner at Jacobs Engineering in Chicago who was born and raised in Columbus. I started that site when I was an undergraduate student at OSU, but haven't done much work on it since I had my first child nine months ago. I do have a contact link to my e-mail on the site if you need to get in touch. I also post frequently for Xing Columbus.

As to your one criticism, I kind of guessed that other places might have "Freeway BRT," but I did think of it independently. In fact, I kind of created my concept of BRT in general in about 2000 or 2001 before I found out that it was an actual thing.

Alon Levy

Um, forget my above comment. I wrote it based on Jarrett's map here, which is only a small portion of the overall map proposed by John, which has decent inner-city density.

John

Thanks for the clarification Alon. I actually would like to take the time to update my plans, but I probably won't have time to do it. Some things I want to work on include more overlapping routes on the highest demand corridors, more of a transit center concept for the outlying areas, and an easier to understand downtown map.

I suppose it's not all that important that I update it though since it's just my fantasy for Columbus transit service. Nevertheless, it's a more pragmatic fantasy than the ones we post here, so maybe it's of some value. Thanks for the positive feedback.

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the firm

Jarrett is now in ...

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